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Pacific Institute Insights is the staff blog of the Pacific Institute, one of the world’s leading nonprofit research groups on sustainable and equitable management of natural resources. For more about what we do, click here.

  • Nigiri at the Landscape Scale: Salmon on Rice Rolls Up Multiple Benefits for Fish and Farms

    By Anna Olive Klein, Agricultural Water Steward Project Coordinator

    November 19, 2013

    Salmon on rice, also known as Nigiri, is a popular sushi dish among enthusiasts of the Japanese delicacy known for its tasty simplicity. The Nigiri Project at Knaggs Ranch is, as the name suggests, a hub for salmon-on-rice connoisseurs. But not quite as you’d think.

    Though the name is inspired by the sushi dish, the Nigiri Project is actually a collaborative effort working to understand and test the multiple benefits of nurturing young salmon on agricultural rice paddies in the Yolo Bypass of the Sacramento River Valley. …»

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  • Up-scaling Sustainable Agriculture Initiatives on the Water Action Hub

    By Mai-Lan Ha, Research Associate

    November 19, 2013

    Technology for development has been a hot topic in the development sphere, particularly here in the Bay Area. The rapid advancements in broadband and mobile technology, combined with the proliferation of mobile applications, and increasing internet penetration rates worldwide have allowed these new tools to take a central role in programs working to meet sustainable development objectives.

    A few weeks ago, I attended Net Impact’s annual conference as a judge for AT&T and EDF’s Ideathon, “How Would You Address the Water Crisis,” focused on utilizing mobile technology to help address the issue of water scarcity. The participants were thoughtful young professionals and students interested in understanding more about the water crisis and working with others to develop real solutions to address it. …»

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  • “Water to Supply the Land” Describes Irrigated Agriculture in the Colorado River Basin

    By Joseph Ferrell, Communications Intern

    November 7, 2013

    The Colorado River is a tightly controlled network of dams and diversions, spanning seven states in the U.S. and two in Mexico, providing water for fish and wildlife, agriculture, industry, and cities along the way. More than 35 million people depend on the Colorado River basin for at least part of their water supply. Yet the river is so over-appropriated that it usually fails to flow to the sea; altered flow regimes, depleted water levels, and degraded water quality have pushed many species to the brink of extinction, leading the Colorado to be named America’s most endangered river. Two years ago the Pacific Institute provided compelling data on Municipal Deliveries of Colorado River Basin Water, documenting  the impressive water-efficiency gains made in many of the cities served by the river. …»

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  • The Sacramento Bee: Why I’m still confused about the proposed tunnels in the Delta

    By Peter Gleick, Pacific Institute President

    November 6, 2013

    This blog post originally was posted on The Sacramento Bee on November 6, 2013. 

    I and my colleagues at the Pacific Institute have worked on California water issues for more than a quarter of a century. It is therefore no surprise that we get asked on a regular basis by friends, journalists and colleagues what we think about the efforts underway to resolve the problems of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and in particular, about the proposed massive tunnel project to divert water from the Sacramento River to the conveyance aqueducts south of the Delta. …»

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  • Water Managers and Social Media: How to Get Started

    By Paula Luu, Communications Manager

    October 24, 2013

    A few of you have reached out to me after I wrote about why water managers should invest in social media. It looks like I’ve managed to convince a few of you that it’s worthwhile, but now what?

    Here are a few tips and tricks to help you get things off the ground:

    Figure out which social sites to engage on given your customers and goals. …»

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  • Water Vlogged: Where There Is No Water Utility

    By Misha Hutchings, Senior Research Associate

    September 27, 2013

    In cities throughout Indonesia, utilities employ some of the latest technologies to supply treated water to millions of residents. However, service still isn’t available to thousands of those who are living in informal neighborhoods (slums) or just outside service networks. How, then—and from where—do these residents get their daily water for drinking, bathing, and washing? Here are just a few examples of typical urban water sources in medium and large-size Indonesian cities. …»

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  • Collective Action on Water – To What End?

    By Jason Morrison, Program Director and Peter Schulte, Research Associate

    September 17, 2013

    The United Nations has designated 2013 as the International Year of Water Cooperation, which highlights the critical importance of cross-sectoral collaboration in promoting sustainable water management. But just to make an obvious point, public-private water stewardship partnerships are not about collective action simply for the sake of collective action; they’re about jointly tackling shared water challenges. And the highest priority ones at that.

    In recent years, companies are beginning to think more systemically and strategically about with whom and on what water issues they look to engage in a collective action context. The $2 billion dollar question (conservative estimate) becomes: are the other two segments of society – public sector and civil society – doing the same? …»

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  • First-Time Researcher

    By Christina McGhee, Diversity for Sustainability Summer Intern 2013

    September 12, 2013

    When I think of climate change, I think of the doom and gloom associated with it. I think big world changes or bust! I wonder what the near future will look like with necessary high-rise infrastructure and climate change survivors along the coastlines forced to relocate from their homes, now permenantly flooded. The words “resilience” and “adaptation” are at the back burner of my thoughts. However, when I began my Diversity for Sustainability Summer Internship with the Pacific Institute, I found myself constantly challenging my previous notions of how to deal with climate change. This was my first intensive research project just outside of school. …»

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  • AT&T Tool Kit Uncovers Billions of Gallons of Potential Water Savings in Cooling Systems

    Guest Blog by John Schulz, Director, AT&T Sustainability Operations

    September 4, 2013 

    “Great discoveries and improvements invariably involve the cooperation of many minds.”  – Alexander Graham Bell

    Coming from a telecommunications company and attending a conference entitled Water Cooperation – Building Partnerships, I find this an appropriate quote with which to open. It is true that while we can attribute some of the greatest inventions of our time to individuals, it is hardly those individuals alone who achieve them. This is especially true when tackling the challenge to protect and preserve a shared resource such as water. …»

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  • Many Agricultural Water Districts Fail to Submit Required Water Management Plans: Laggards Can Learn from Leaders

    By Dr. Juliet Christian-Smith, Senior Research Associate

    September 3, 2013 

    A few years ago, the California Legislature passed the Water Conservation Act of 2009, which among other things, required large agricultural water providers to begin preparing agricultural water management plans (as urban water providers have done for over a decade). These plans are a key component to encouraging better water planning, management, and efficient use. They also help water managers and consumers understand where the state’s precious water resources are going and efforts to improve water-use productivity.

    At the end of 2012, the first round of agricultural water management plans were due. Yet, a new study, from the Pacific Institute and Natural Resources Defense Council, finds that only 24 out of 79 agricultural water district in California submitted agricultural water management plans, leaving 55 districts out of compliance. This represents a 30% compliance rate.

    …»

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