75 Multi-Benefit Resources


Measuring the success of climate change adaptation and mitigation in terrestrial ecosystems

Author: Morecroft et al., American Association for the Advancement of Science (2019)
Geography:
Level of Detail:

Availability:

Water Management Strategies: ,

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs: ,


Measuring the success of climate change adaptation and mitigation in terrestrial ecosystems examines how restoration can impact carbon sequestration and improve ecosystem resilience. This review paper examined 70 different studies and identifies synergies between restoration, climate, and people as an important step to ensure restoration effectiveness.

Quantifying the Potential Benefits of Land Conservation on Water Supply to Optimize Return on Investments

Author: Eddy et al., The Water Research Foundation (2019)
Geography:
Level of Detail: ,

Availability:

Water Management Strategies: , , ,

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs: , , ,


Quantifying the Potential Benefits of Land Conservation on Water Supply to Optimize Return on Investments uses economic valuation to determine specific spatial areas for conservation and development in the Catawba-Wateree Watershed. Using spatial models, potential conserved areas that would create the largest benefits were identified based on their reduction in sediment load. Other valuations such as air quality improvements from forest management are also considered.

Portland’s Green Infrastructure: Quantifying the Health, Energy, and Community Livability Benefits

Author: City of Portland Bureau of Environmental Services (2010)
Geography:
Level of Detail:

Availability:

Water Management Strategies: , ,

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs: , , , , , , , ,


Portland’s Green Infrastructure: Quantifying the Health, Energy, and Community Livability Benefits quantifies the benefits of green infrastructure (GI) initiatives. Using available research and data, the city quantified benefits in energy and described benefits to community livability and health. This report breaks down the benefits by different GI types to show how projects impact each benefit category.

Rapid Benefit Indicators (RBI) Approach

Author: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (N/A)
Geography:
Level of Detail: ,

Availability:

Water Management Strategies: ,

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs: , ,


The Rapid Benefit Indicators (RBI) approach allows users to quickly estimate and quantify non-monetary benefits to people around an ecological restoration site. It includes several tools to help users develop and summarize indicators as well as a spatial tool for geographic analysis of benefits.

How much water can be captured from flood flows to store in depleted aquifers for mitigating floods and droughts? A case study from Texas, US

Author: Yang & Scanlon, The University of Texas at Austin (2019)
Geography:
Level of Detail: ,

Availability:

Water Management Strategies: , , , , , ,

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs: , , , ,


How much water can be captured from flood flows to store in depleted aquifers for mitigating floods and droughts? A case study from Texas, US presents a case study of the opportunity to capture high magnitude flows from 10 major rivers discharging to the Gulf of Mexico and storage potential in nearby depleted aquifers. This modeling study explores managed aquifer recharge with flood flows as an approach to reducing flooding and addressing water supply challenges during droughts.

Lower Snake River Dams: Economic Tradeoffs of Removal

Author: EconNorthwest (2019)
Geography:
Level of Detail: , ,

Availability:

Water Management Strategies: ,

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs: , , , , , , , , ,


The report, Lower Snake River Dams: Economic Tradeoffs of Removal, analyzes the costs and benefits of removing four dams along the lower Snake River in Washington State. The analysis applies economic values to the following benefits and tradeoffs: changes related to hydropower electric grid services, irrigation water supply, transportation along on the river corridor, recreation, and non-use values such as a restored natural river system and reduced extinction risk of wild salmon.

Nature-Based Solutions Evidence Tool

Author: University of Oxford (2019)
Geography:
Level of Detail: ,

Availability:

Water Management Strategies: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,


The Nature-Based Solutions Evidence Tool is primarily an online catalog of peer-reviewed research that provides evidence of the impacts of nature-based solutions (NbS) on a wide variety of benefit categories. The tool allows the user to filter results in a variety of ways, including by intervention type, habitat type, climate change impact, effect of Nbs on ecosystem service, geography, and more. Results are displayed in a variety of formats, helping the user to understand the landscape of quantitative and economic research related to a variety of NbSs.

Economics for the Environment Project Page

Author: Economics for the Environment (2019)
Geography:
Level of Detail: , ,

Availability:

Water Management Strategies: , ,

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs: , , , , , , , ,


The Economics for the Environment Project Page provides summaries of several case studies and economic valuations for natural resources in the United Kingdom. Projects include analysis of natural flood management, economic valuation of urban natural capital, and chemical usage in watersheds.

i-Tree

Author: USDA Forest Service, Davey Tree Expert Company, Arborday Foundation, Society of Municipal Arborists, International Society of Arboriculture, Casey Trees, and SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry (2019)
Geography:
Level of Detail: ,

Availability:

Water Management Strategies: ,

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs: , , , , , , , ,


The i-Tree portal allows environmental managers to quantify benefits of urban and rural forestry. The website provides tools from the USDA Forest Service based on scientific studies to create tangible ecosystem services. These tools allow for the calculation of benefits from the parcel to state level.

COMET-Planner

Author: USDA, Colorado State (2019)
Geography:
Level of Detail: ,

Availability:

Water Management Strategies: , , ,

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs: ,


The COMET-Planner provides estimates of greenhouse gas emissions for specific agricultural conservation practices. The tool allows for farmers and managers to select potential strategies and quantify the emissions based on the number of acres adopting the practice.

Plant Community Composition and Biodiversity Patterns in Urban Parks of Portland, Oregon

Author: Talal & Santelmann, Oregon State University (2019)
Geography:
Level of Detail:

Availability:

Water Management Strategies:

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs: ,


Plant Community Composition and Biodiversity Patterns in Urban Parks of Portland, Oregon examines the correlations between park attributes and plant communities. This research article shows significant relationships between park type and the presence of non-native or native species. It also provides analysis on which parks provide the best habitat for specific groups of species. The results help managers to optimize park plans to protect desired species and incorporate biodiversity benefits into design of green spaces.

EnviroAtlas

Author: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (N/A)
Geography:
Level of Detail: ,

Availability:

Water Management Strategies: ,

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs: , , ,


EnviroAtlas is an online mapping and analysis tool by the U.S. EPA that allows users to evaluate the potential impact of proposed infrastructure and policy decisions on human health, the economy, and the environment. Data and other resources are freely available for download.

From brown to green? Assessing social vulnerability to environmental gentrification in New York City

Author: Hamil Pearsall, Clark University (2010)
Geography:
Level of Detail:

Availability:

Water Management Strategies: , ,

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs: , , , , , ,


From brown to green? Assessing social vulnerability to environmental gentrification in New York City uses multiple linear regression to examine which factors determine if environmental improvements lead to gentrification. The report finds populations with low or fixed income such as seniors, people with disabilities, and people dependent on federal assistance can be significantly impacted by environmental gentrification. Areas that were redeveloped adjacent to other desirable amenities such as waterfront access, and easy public transit access experienced higher ecological gentrification.

Towards a New Paradigm of Urban Water Infrastructure: Identifying Goals and Strategies to Support Multi-Benefit Municipal Wastewater Treatment

Author: Harris-Lovett, Lienert, & Sedlak, University of California, Berkeley (2018)
Geography:
Level of Detail: ,

Availability:

Water Management Strategies: , , , ,

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs: , , , , , , , , , , , ,


Towards a New Paradigm of Urban Water Infrastructure: Identifying Goals and Strategies to Support Multi-Benefit Municipal Wastewater Treatment examines the decision making barriers to adopting multibenefit solutions. Transitioning to a new paradigm of water management that supports and advances projects with multiple benefits will require new approaches, tools, and systems. This article attempts to identify the obstacles for these new requirements through a study from the San Francisco Bay Area.

Economic Benefits: Metics and Methods for Landscape Performance Assessment

Author: Wang et al., Utah State University (2016)
Geography:
Level of Detail:

Availability:

Water Management Strategies: , , , , , , ,

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs: , , , , , , ,


The Economic Benefits: Metrics and Methods for Landscape Performance Assessment presents a method and standard metrics for assessing the economic benefits of landscapes. This method and the associated metrics can be used to increase the scientific rigor of landscape architecture and to help achieve high(er) levels of sustainability in the built environment. Three test cases are used to demonstrate the utility of the method.

Landscape Performance Series

Author: Landscape Architecture Foundation (N/A)
Geography:
Level of Detail: , , , ,

Availability:

Water Management Strategies: , , , ,

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs: , , , , ,


The Landscape Performance Series is a compilation of case studies, fact sheets, and a Benefits Toolkit, to support sustainable landscape design. It is available for designers, agencies, and advocates to help evaluate performance, show value, and make the case for landscapes.

Landscape Performance Series: Benefits Toolkit

Author: Landscape Architecture Foundation (N/A)
Geography:
Level of Detail: ,

Availability:

Water Management Strategies: , , , ,

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs: , ,


The Benefits Toolkit, housed in the Landscape Performance Series, lists calculators and tools that directly help with quantifying the benefits of landscapes. Users can filter results by “Landscape Performance Benefit” including several options for water-related benefits.

Green Infrastructure Co-Benefits Valuation Tool

Author: Armstrong, Earth Economics, GI Exchange (2019)
Geography:
Level of Detail: ,

Availability:

Water Management Strategies: , , , , ,

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,


The Green Infrastructure Co-benefits Valuation Tool is intended to provide a framework, methods, and values to support rapid screening-level analysis of the costs and benefits associated with a range of GI investments. The tool itself is based in Microsoft Excel and comes with a users guide and fact sheet.

The environmental benefits of water recycling and reuse

Author: Anderson, Dept. of Public Works and Services, Sydney, Australia (2003)
Geography:
Level of Detail: , ,

Availability:

Water Management Strategies:

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs:


The environmental benefits of water recycling and reuse presents on the links between water reuse and sustainable water management through the examination of a variety of case studies from Australia. Some case studies included also quantify the environmental benefits of water reuse.

Moving Toward a Multiple Benefits Approach for Water Management

Author: Diringer et al., (2019)
Geography:
Level of Detail: , , , ,

Availability:

Water Management Strategies: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs: , , , , , ,


The Pacific Institute’s report, Moving Toward a Multiple Benefits Approach for Water Management, proposes a framework for systematically identifying and incorporating the multiple benefits and trade-offs of water management strategies into decision-making processes. The framework can help users broaden support for a policy or project; identify opportunities to share costs among project beneficiaries; minimize adverse and unintended consequences; optimize the investment of time, money, and other resources; and increase transparency associated with water management decisions.

NatCap Checker

Author: Natural Capital Coalition (2019)
Geography:
Level of Detail: , ,

Availability:

Water Management Strategies: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs: , , , , , ,


The NatCap Checker is a tool by the Natural Capital Coalition, created to help organizations make more informed decisions that help conserve and enhance the natural capital that we all depend upon. It is a self-assessment tool that enables practitioners to assess, communicate, and improve the level of confidence in their natural capital assessments.

Nature and Health

Author: Hartig et al., (2014)
Geography:
Level of Detail: ,

Availability:

Water Management Strategies: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs: , , , , ,


This article presents the state of knowledge with regards to human health and well-being from contact with nature. The article includes a discussion of the term “nature,” a review of relevant research including linkages between nature and benefits, and the gaps, challenges, methodological approaches that could be used for future research.

Green Cities: Good Health

Author: University of Washington, U.S. Forest Service, and Urban and Community Forestry (N/A)
Geography:
Level of Detail: , , ,

Availability:

Water Management Strategies: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs: , , , , , ,


Green Cities: Good Health is an online compilation and synthesis of research related to urban green spaces and human health and well-being. The website includes introductory material, summaries of current research into the numerous benefits of urban green space, future research, and a comprehensive list of references.

Neighborhood greenspace and health in a large urban center

Author: Kardan et al., (2015)
Geography:
Level of Detail: , ,

Availability:

Water Management Strategies: , ,

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs: ,


This study links tree density in an urban center (Toronto, Canada) to results of a health survey using statistical methods. The findings indicate that more trees improve health perception and health outcomes.

Climate Change: Opportunities to Reduce Federal Fiscal Exposure

Author: U.S. Government Accountability Office (2019)
Geography:
Level of Detail: ,

Availability:

Water Management Strategies:

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs: , , , , , ,


The U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) has released an analysis of the economic costs and benefits of climate change to U.S. sectors and regions. This report focuses on the fiscal exposure faced by the U.S. federal government to climate change risks.

Water Resources Management: Optimizing within a Watershed Context

Author: Zoltay, Kirshen, & Vogel, (2007)
Geography:
Level of Detail:

Availability:

Water Management Strategies:

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs: , , , ,


This resource provides an explanation of a model that was developed to evaluate a broad range of technical, economic, and policy management options within a watershed context. Inputs to the model include water quantity and water quality, with outputs including flow and concentrations. The authors hypothesize that this model will help to demonstrate the value of a wide variety of water management options and support integrated water resources management decisions.

Restoring Natural Fire Regimes Can Yield More Water Downstream

Author: Biosramé et al., University of California, Berkeley (2019)
Geography:
Level of Detail:

Availability:

Water Management Strategies: ,

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs:


Research from Yosemite National Park provides a new understanding of one of the potential benefits of restoring a forest’s natural fire regime: more downstream flow and less water stress. Since the 1970s one watershed in Yosemite has been managed to allow for a natural fire regime, leading to a reduction in vegetation density across the basin. Their findings from modeling differences in water stress and downstream flow suggest that fire suppression would have led to increased water stress and decreased downstream flows as compared to the current management strategy of allowing for natural fires.

Performance of Two Bioswales on Urban Runoff Management

Author: Xiao et al., (2017)
Geography:
Level of Detail: ,

Availability:

Water Management Strategies: , ,

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs: ,


This study evaluated the effectiveness of two bioswales eight years after construction in Davis, California. An identically sized control bioswale consisting of non-disturbed native soil was located adjacent to the treatment bioswale. Surface runoff quantity and quality were measured during three experiments with different pollutant loads.

Thermal performance of extensive green roofs in cold climates

Author: Liu & Baskaran, National Research Council Canada (2005)
Geography:
Level of Detail: ,

Availability:

Water Management Strategies: ,

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs: ,


In this study, the performance of two extensive green roofs located in the City of Toronto, Ontario, Canada was monitored. The green roofs varied in system components, types and depths of growing medium, vegetation coverage and types of roofing systems. The green roofs were instrumented with sensor networks to provide thermal performance data.

Water LA

Author: The River Project (2018)
Geography:
Level of Detail: , ,

Availability:

Water Management Strategies: , , , , ,

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,


The 2018 Water LA report by the River Project explores the opportunities for and challenges of building a resilient region by making small, distributed changes to the urban landscape. The report offers a case study from LA where parcel-scale water management projects provide different social, environmental, and economic benefits.

Perceived species-richness in urban green spaces: Cues, accuracy and well-being impacts

Author: Southon et al., (2018)
Geography:
Level of Detail:

Availability:

Water Management Strategies: ,

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs: , ,


The authors of Perceived species-richness in urban green spaces…explore the impact of creating biodiverse landscapes within an urban space on users of that space. They assess the impacts of biodiversity on user health and well-being and on factors affecting health and well-being.

Psychological benefits of greenspace increase with biodiversity

Author: Fuller et al., (2007)
Geography:
Level of Detail:

Availability:

Water Management Strategies: ,

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs: ,


Psychological benefits of greenspace increase with biodiversity provides evidence that suggests that psychological benefits of greenspace increase with species richness. They argue that their findings indicate that successful management of urban greenspaces should emphasize biological complexity for human health and well-being.

Biodiverse perennial meadows have aesthetic value and increase residents’ perceptions of site quality in urban green-space

Author: Southon et al., (2017)
Geography:
Level of Detail: ,

Availability:

Water Management Strategies: ,

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs: , ,


Researches used photos and as well as actual urban green spaces converted to meadows to evaluate perceptions of visitors to these spaces in southern England. Perennial meadows increased perceived quality and appreciation of urban green space, with visitors showing a higher preference for meadows with higher plant and structural diversity.

Health Lands and Healthy Economies website

Author: Sonoma County Ag + Open Space (N/A)
Geography:
Level of Detail: ,

Availability:

Water Management Strategies:

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs: , , , ,


This is the landing page for Sonoma County Ag + Open Space Health Lands & Healthy Economies program. This website includes links to many resources on multi-benefit valuation of agricultural and natural lands.

The Blueprint for Increased Investment in Green Infrastructure

Author: Earth Economics (2018)
Geography:
Level of Detail: ,

Availability:

Water Management Strategies: , , , , ,

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,


The Blueprint for Increased Investment in Green Infrastructure is a comprehensive resource for water managers and other decision makers seeking to start or expand investment in green infrastructure. The Blueprint presents five major cultural and institutional shifts that are required at the municipal level for the grown in green infrastructure. Data, tools, tips, and other resources are also provided.

On Spatially Distributed Hydrologic Ecosystem Services: Bridging the Quantitative Information Gap Using Remote Sensing and Hydrological Models

Author: Simons et al., (2017)
Geography:
Level of Detail:

Availability:

Water Management Strategies: , , , , , ,

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,


The white paper, On Spatially Distributed Hydrologic Ecosystem Services, provides an explanation of and use case examples for a hydrologic ecosystem services model. This is a useful resource for quantification of water-related ecosystem services.The model is spatially and temporally designed for basin-scale analyses.

The estimated impact of California’s urban water conservation mandate on electricity consumption and greenhouse gas emissions

Author: Spang, Holguin, & Loge, (2018)
Geography:
Level of Detail: ,

Availability:

Water Management Strategies: , ,

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs: , , , , , ,


In The estimated impact of California’s urban water conservation mandate on electricity consumption and greenhouse gas emissions, Spang et al. use the reported water conservation data to assess how the water utilities have responded to the 2015 California water reduction mandate and to estimate the electricity savings and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reductions associated with reduced operation of urban water infrastructure systems.

Embedded Energy in Water Studies 1, 2 and 3

Author: California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) (2010)
Geography:
Level of Detail: ,

Availability:

Water Management Strategies: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs: , , , ,


CPUCs Embedded Energy in Water Studies provide a California statewide assessment of energy use by the water sector and energy use by water customers. There are three separate reports, each including supporting appendices and materials, that document methodology, data collection, case studies, and findings of the investigation.

Opportunities for natural infrastructure to improve urban water security in Latin America

Author: Tellman et al., (2018)
Geography:
Level of Detail: ,

Availability:

Water Management Strategies: , , , , , ,

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs: , , , , ,


Opportunities for natural infrastructure to improve urban water security in Latin America offers a continent-scale analysis of ecosystem services provided by watershed conservation and other land management activities. The authors present a method for assessing the potential for watershed conservation activities to improve surface drinking water quality and mitigate flood risks.

Valuing investments in sustainable land management in the Upper Tana River basin, Kenya

Author: Vogl et al., (2017)
Geography:
Level of Detail: ,

Availability:

Water Management Strategies: , , ,

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,


Valuing investments in sustainable land management in the Upper Tana basin, Kenya provides a case study of valuing ecosystem services using the InVEST model (of the Natural Capital Project) to assess the multiple benefits of land management practices in a large, diverse watershed. This study provides detailed analysis of targeted interventions that take into account stakeholder preferences, local environmental and socio-economic conditions. The outputs of the model link biophysical outputs to monetary metrics, including reduced water treatment costs, increased hydropower production, and crop yield benefits.

Informing watershed planning and policy in the Truckee River basin through stakeholder engagement, scenario development, and impact evaluation

Author: Podolak et al., (2017)
Geography:
Level of Detail: ,

Availability:

Water Management Strategies: , , , ,

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs: , , , , ,


In Informing watershed planning… Podolak et al. evaluate the water quality and water quantity impacts of stream andl and restoration activities in the Truckee River watershed, in the context of regulatory compliance goals. Using the InVEST model to compare stakeholder-determined scenarios of different restoration activities, locations, and investment levels, the results demonstrate how these differences impact water quality outcomes.

Urban Nature for Human Health and Well-Being

Author: USDA (2018)
Geography:
Level of Detail: ,

Availability:

Water Management Strategies:

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs: , ,


Urban Nature for Human Health and Well-Being summarizes the most recent research on connections between human health and natural urban spaces and features. This paper presents new and ongoing studies that seek to address the quantitative and qualitative impacts of green spaces on human mental, emotional, and physical well-being.

The Green Edge: How Commercial Property Investment in Green Infrastructure Creates Value

Author: Clements & St. Juliana, NRDC (2013)
Geography:
Level of Detail: , , ,

Availability:

Water Management Strategies: , , , , ,

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs: , , , , , , , , , , ,


This report explores the range of economic benefits that accrue to commercial property owners (including owners of multifamily residential buildings) when they install green infrastructure on their property to improve stormwater management.

Life cycle based analysis of demands and emissions for residential water-using appliances

Author: Lee & Tansel, (2012)
Geography:
Level of Detail:

Availability:

Water Management Strategies: , , , ,

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs: , , , , , , ,


Life cycle based analysis of demands and emissions for residential water-using appliances focuses on the indirect consumption and environmental impacts from end-use water demand of household appliances. It quantifies the energy and greenhouse gas emissions from three residential water-using appliances using life-cycle analysis.

The value of public and private green spaces under water restrictions

Author: MacDonald et al., (2010)
Geography:
Level of Detail:

Availability:

Water Management Strategies: ,

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs: , , ,


The value of public and private green spaces under water restrictions analyzes the economic impact of outdoor watering restrictions on private and public landscapes. The results show that outdoor watering restrictions do not have an impact on the value of private landscapes, but may have implications for public landscape usage.

Methods to Assess Co-Benefits of California Climate Investments: Water Supply and Availability

Author: Einstein & Litke, Center for Resource Efficient Communities, UC-Berkeley (2017)
Geography:
Level of Detail: , ,

Availability:

Water Management Strategies: , , ,

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs: , , , , , , , , , , , ,


Methods to Assess Co-benefits of California Climate Investments: Water Supply and Availability is a literature review of the different methodologies and approaches to quantifying the water supply and availability benefits from California Climate Investment projects. California Climate Investments are a broad group of projects being pursued across the state to help reduce greenhouse gas emissions, such as wetland restoration and urban tree planting. While the literature review is targeted at California projects, some of the information provided could be applicable more broadly in the U.S.

Co-benefits Assessment Methodology for Water Savings

Author: California Air Resources Board (2018)
Geography:
Level of Detail:

Availability:

Water Management Strategies: , , , , , , , ,

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs: , ,


Co-benefits Assessment Methodology for Water Savings presents three different water co-benefit assessment methods for three types of projects from the California Climate Investments. The three project types are agricultural irrigation, residential, commercial, or institutional water efficiency, and urban landscaping. The assessment methods are presented from a California perspective, however, the same methods could be applied in different locations with appropriate modifications for climate and other relevant factors.

Modelling Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Large Wood Recruitment, Transport, and Deposition at the River Reach Scale during Extreme Floods

Author: Zischg et al., (2018)
Geography:
Level of Detail:

Availability:

Water Management Strategies: ,

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs: , , ,


Modelling Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Large Wood Recruitment, Transport, and Deposition at the River Reach Scale during Extreme Floods presents a modelling exercise to evaluate the dynamics of large woody debris during flooding events. This technical assessment can provide decision makers with another method for evaluating the tradeoffs between flood risks and riparian health from large woody debris in stream systems.

Healthy Lands and Healthy Economies: The multiple benefits of Sonoma County working and natural lands

Author: Sonoma County Ag + Open Space (2018)
Geography:
Level of Detail: ,

Availability:

Water Management Strategies: , , , , ,

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,


Sonoma County Ag + Open Space presents the results of a thorough economic assessment of the county’s agricultural and natural lands, incorporating the multiple benefits of these landscapes.

Accounting for U.S. ecosystem services at national and subnational scales

Author: Bagstad, Ingram, & Shapiro, John Wesley Powell Center for Analysis and Synthesis (N/A)
Geography:
Level of Detail: ,

Availability:

Water Management Strategies:

Specific Benefits or Trade-offs: , , , , , , ,


Accounting for U.S. ecosystem services at national and subnational scales is an ongoing project of the John Wesley Powell Center for Analysis and Synthesis to create a natural capital accounting tool within the United States. Natural capital accounting involves the national compilation of data, models, valuation frameworks in order to encourage the protection of natural capital. The project aims to provide quantified and monetized ecosystem services on a national and subnational scale.