August 2017 Newsletter

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In this month’s newsletter:

  • World Water Week in Stockholm
  • Corporate Engagement on Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene
  • Why Go for Desal When California Has Cheaper Options?

And more!

Read the August 2017 Newsletter

July 2014 Online Update

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july-2014-online-updateIn this month’s Online Update:

  • New Look and Features Launched on California Drought Website
  • Water Footprint Research Can Inform California Policy Decisions
  • Oakland Leaders Self-Care Training Builds Resilience in Communities Impacted by Climate Change
  • Participatory Research on Improving the Impact of Water Stewardship Initiatives in Africa
  • Water-Related Collective Action in California and the Colorado River Basin

And more!

Read the July 2014 Online Update

 

June 2014 Online Update

Posted on:

june-2014-online-updateIn this month’s Online Update:

  • Untapped Potential for California’s Water Supply
  • Business Role in Advancing Sustainable Water Management
  • Catalyzing Water-Related Collective-Action in the Colorado River Basin
  • E-books Promotion 

And more!

Read the June 2014 Online Update

May 2014 Online Update

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may-2014-online-updateIn this month’s Online Update:

  • Peace-Development Strategy Proposed by Oakland Youth
  • Update on the California Drought
  • Launch of Water Stewardship Standard
  • Water Rate Prices Increase

And more!

Read the May 2014 Online Update

CURYJ and the Pacific Institute Release a “Foto-Novela” to Lift Youth’s Stories of Justice, Safety, and Displacement

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No More Violence: Oakland’s Youth Propose Peace-Development Strategy

forgotton-voices-coverMay 2, 2014, Oakland, CA: Living in neighborhoods compounded by violence and simultaneous gentrification, Oakland youth – with the support of the Pacific Institute and Communities United for Restorative Youth Justice (CURYJ) – have released the “foto-novela” Forgotten Voices to share their experiences and vision for creating opportunities for men of color. The foto-novela, available in both English and Spanish, comes out of the organizations’ Youth Empowerment Zone Project which aims to build the leadership capacity of young people directly impacted by proposed gang injunction ordinances in Oakland’s Fruitvale District.

“Forgotten Voices is compelling documentation of how to build healthy communities and bottom-up power. These aren’t top-down ordinances, but solutions from the ground up that reflect the patterns in youths’ shared experiences,” said Ruben Leal, a community organizer with CURYJ.

In a community where violence prevention strategies have criminalized the very youth the policies are meant to protect, the Youth Empowerment Zone Project created Community Research positions for the young men of color listed in Oakland’s gang injunction ordinances, recognizing them as thought leaders on youth violence prevention and community safety issues. Together and with the support of seasoned community activists and researchers, these “Hood Reporters” have created a comic-book-style short story which features photos taken by the youth and dialogue they have written to identify issues of concern in their communities, document community conditions, and generate solutions to create healthier communities.

 “Until now, there hasn’t been a story behind the faces and the root cause of violence in Oakland,” said George Galvis, co-founder and director of CURYJ. “We believe that neighborhoods affected by ‘turf violence’ can be transformed by the young people most impacted by that violence. Using participatory research tools like hand-drawn mapping, picture-taking, and peer-to-peer interviews, we have called on some of East Oakland’s street leaders to help develop a comprehensive peace-development strategy.”

Reducing youth violence will be key for Oakland to build healthy communities over the long term. By developing a youth-led vision in East Oakland that identifies specific improvements for existing violence prevention programs and services as well as broader policy and systems changes needed to support young people’s development, the Youth Empowerment Zone Project has provided these young men with the relevant resources, support, and opportunities to become positive forces for change in their communities.

“We need to begin to be innovative and creative about how we think about these issues to really address root causes of violence and the stability in communities most impacted by gang injunctions,” said Catalina Garzón of the Pacific Institute. “Gentrification and the increasing housing costs are destabilizing communities. Increased policing has been counterproductive by criminalizing our youth. It’s about healing – not about punishment – because what’s valued is sustaining community and family ties.”

Forgotten Voices is a tool that communities can use to build community power by lifting up the knowledge of those directly affected by violence, building a shared analysis of the root causes of violence based on lived experiences, and generating policy solutions that address these root causes.

Download the foto-novela Forgotten Voices in English (PDF).

Descarga el foto-novela Voces Olvidadas en Español (PDF).

Download the foto-novela Forgotten Voices in English and Spanish (PDF).

To learn more about getting involved in the next stages of the Empowerment Zone, contact George Galvis, georgegalvis (at) gmail.com, (510) 689-7350.

CURYJ and the Pacific Institute Release a “Foto-Novela” to Lift Youth’s Stories of Justice, Safety, and Displacement

Posted on:

Published: May 5, 2014
Authors: George Galvis, Catalina Garzón, Freddy Gutierrez, Ruben Leal, Michael Muscadine, Mar Velez
Pages: 32

No More Violence: Oakland’s Youth Propose Peace-Development Strategy

forgotton-voices-coverLiving in neighborhoods compounded by violence and simultaneous gentrification, Oakland youth – with the support of the Pacific Institute and Communities United for Restorative Youth Justice (CURYJ) – have released the “foto-novela” Forgotten Voices to share their experiences and vision for creating opportunities for men of color. The foto-novela, available in both English and Spanish, comes out of the organizations’ Youth Empowerment Zone Project which aims to build the leadership capacity of young people directly impacted by proposed gang injunction ordinances in Oakland’s Fruitvale District.

“Forgotten Voices is compelling documentation of how to build healthy communities and bottom-up power. These aren’t top-down ordinances, but solutions from the ground up that reflect the patterns in youths’ shared experiences,” said Ruben Leal, a community organizer with CURYJ.

In a community where violence prevention strategies have criminalized the very youth the policies are meant to protect, the Youth Empowerment Zone Project created Community Research positions for the young men of color listed in Oakland’s gang injunction ordinances, recognizing them as thought leaders on youth violence prevention and community safety issues. Together and with the support of seasoned community activists and researchers, these “Hood Reporters” have created a comic-book-style short story which features photos taken by the youth and dialogue they have written to identify issues of concern in their communities, document community conditions, and generate solutions to create healthier communities.

 “Until now, there hasn’t been a story behind the faces and the root cause of violence in Oakland,” said George Galvis, co-founder and director of CURYJ. “We believe that neighborhoods affected by ‘turf violence’ can be transformed by the young people most impacted by that violence. Using participatory research tools like hand-drawn mapping, picture-taking, and peer-to-peer interviews, we have called on some of East Oakland’s street leaders to help develop a comprehensive peace-development strategy.”

Reducing youth violence will be key for Oakland to build healthy communities over the long term. By developing a youth-led vision in East Oakland that identifies specific improvements for existing violence prevention programs and services as well as broader policy and systems changes needed to support young people’s development, the Youth Empowerment Zone Project has provided these young men with the relevant resources, support, and opportunities to become positive forces for change in their communities.

“We need to begin to be innovative and creative about how we think about these issues to really address root causes of violence and the stability in communities most impacted by gang injunctions,” said Catalina Garzón of the Pacific Institute. “Gentrification and the increasing housing costs are destabilizing communities. Increased policing has been counterproductive by criminalizing our youth. It’s about healing – not about punishment – because what’s valued is sustaining community and family ties.”

Forgotten Voices is a tool that communities can use to build community power by lifting up the knowledge of those directly affected by violence, building a shared analysis of the root causes of violence based on lived experiences, and generating policy solutions that address these root causes.

Download the foto-novela Forgotten Voices in English (PDF).

Descarga el foto-novela Voces Olvidadas en Español (PDF).

Download the foto-novela Forgotten Voices in English and Spanish (PDF).

To learn how you can get involved in the next stages of the Empowerment Zone, contact George Galvis, georgegalvis (at) gmail.com, (510) 689-7350

Update From the Pacific Institute California Drought Response Group – April 25

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drought-banner2

For the latest updates about the California drought go to www.californiadrought.org

Read Previous Updates:

This Week in …. Water Allocations

On April 18th, the Department of Water Resources increased State Water Project Allocations from 0% to 5%. 1991 was the last time allocations were cut this low, when municipal customers received 30% of their allocation, while agriculture received none. Today, DWR does not distinguish between customer types when making allocations. The SWP – which delivers water to 29 contractors in California – will still deliver “carryover” water stored by local agencies and water transfers, as well as sufficient supplies for drinking, sanitation and fire protection.

In other Allocation News…

Sacramento River Settlement contractors and Central Valley Project refuges will receive 75% of their contracted supply, up from 40% last week.

…State Water Resources Control Board approved a deal that will allow the Merced Irrigation District to take an additional 30,000 acre-feet of water from Lake McClure.

…After hearing their allocation would be cut in half, districts with strong water rights on the Feather River will receive their full allocation. Some districts are also considering selling about 20% of their water to State Water Contractors south of the delta, at the cost of $500 per acre-foot.

…And for the first time ever, East Bay Municipal Utility District will get water from the Sacramento River.

California Drought Status

US Drought Monitor

The California drought has gotten slightly worse this past week, with 77% of the state in extreme to exceptional drought, up from just over 69% last week.

Source of image:

Source of image: US Drought Monitor

Precipitation

Although precipitation remains a small fraction of the historical average, areas in the north did experience some rainfall this past week. Precipitation is forecast for this weekend in the Bay Area and in the Sierra Nevada mountains, however, it is not expected to have a significant impact on the drought.

 

 

Snowpack

California snowpack is currently at about 14% of the April 1st average, down from 19% last week, and continue to drop rapidly.

 

 

Reservoir Conditions

Statewide, California reservoirs are at about 49% of total capacity and about 66% of the historical average. The state’s nine largest reservoirs, representing about 74% of the state’s capacity, are below 54% of total capacity.

Soil Moisture

California soil moisture has worsened this past week, particularly in parts of Northern California, the Central Valley, the central coast, and the Los Angeles area.

 

 

April 2014 Online Update

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april-2014-online-updateIn this month’s Online Update:

  • U.S. Businesses and Water Challenges 
  • Update on the California Drought
  • The Colorado Flows into the Delta Again
  • Top Global Organizations Pledge to Support Water Stewardship Standard

    And More! 

Read the April 2014 Online Update. 

Pacific Institute Accepting Applications for Communications Internship

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The Pacific Institute in Oakland, Calif. is seeking a part-time, unpaid Communications Intern. The Pacific Institute is an independent nonprofit founded in 1987 that works to create a healthier planet and sustainable communities. We conduct interdisciplinary research and partner with stakeholders to produce solutions that advance environmental protection, economic development, and social equity. We carry out research, publish reports, recommend solutions, and work with decision makers, advocacy groups, and the public to change policy.

The Communications Intern provides support to the Communications department, working to enhance the Institute’s effectiveness by promoting our work to the media, policymakers, academic and scientific communities, local communities, and the general public.

Responsibilities:

This internship requires an individual who can wear a number of hats in assisting in outreach and communications for the Institute. Responsibilities, a number of which are shared with the Communications Manager, include, but are not limited to:

-Compile the Institute’s monthly online newsletter and input final draft into our emailing marketing service.

Assist in monitoring and maintaining lists, such as logging media stories and producing web hits reports.

-Mine the news for stories to post on the Institute social media pages.

-Assist in the development and organization of the Communication Department’s database of contacts, press hits, and collateral materials.

-Archive and manage the storage, use, and distribution of Institute images; acquire photos for blogs and reports.

-Assist in production of reports and materials.

-Maintain Institute style and reference guides and other materials.

Required Qualifications:

– Solid skill (or good working ability and willing/able to acquire more skill quickly) in WordPress and Photoshop for website management.

– Ability to lay out basic publications in Word, importing Excel charts and tables, photos, etc.

– Previous internship experience.

– Proficiency with Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Outlook.

– Strong interpersonal skills and the ability to work closely and constructively with others.

– Ability to manage time effectively, juggle multiple tasks, and set and meet deadlines.

– Flexibility, curiosity, a sense of humor, and self-motivation.

Additional Desired Qualifications:

– Familiarity with working with the press, policymakers, communities, and nonprofit organizations.

– Demonstrated interest in and a commitment to environmental sustainability.

– Experience with website and email campaign design and management.

– New media and/or IT experience.

– Experience with web development and graphic design software.

Details: This is a part-time, 15-20 hours-per-week unpaid internship

Application Process: Please submit a cover letter, resume, one writing sample to:
pluu@pacinst.org

No applications accepted after April 18, 2014.

No calls please.

For information about the Pacific Institute, visit www.pacinst.org.

California Drought Website

Posted on:

drought.orgThe Pacific Institute has launched the website www.californiadrought.org. This compiling of tools, research, and information on the California drought serves as an invaluable resource to facilitate the work at every level to address current issues and plan strategies in the face of a drier future for California and the western United States.

Responding to the drought is responding to a “new normal” water future with climate change, and an opportunity to move to more sustainable water use and water policy for California. With a third dry year in a row, the California drought highlights the serious challenges we face in sustainable water use in the western United States as a whole. It is dry by all measures: the amount of precipitation, of snow in the mountains, in reservoirs, in soil moisture, even in groundwater depth. Impacts are already being felt in cutbacks of water deliveries to agricultural users; impacts on ecosystems, particularly fisheries; urban mandatory and voluntary cutbacks; some small systems literally running out of water from their single source.

We know we can do the things we want to do with a lot less water, and at the same time save money, ecosystems, energy, and water. As part of our leadership work in responding to the California drought, the Pacific Institute created www.californiadrought.org as a resource, come rain or shine, for the “new normal” water future that requires real action today.

Visit californiadrought.org 

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